This is for the best.

Aug 19

her-bleeding-little-blue-boy:

davidtennantbatch:

piper-mclean-rp:

deckatalent:

quezycoatl:

flutterbye-5:

You see these fuckers? They’re my pointe shoes. Now, I don’t know how much you guys know about ballet, but pointe is a style of ballet where the dancer dances on their toes. There’s a wooden box like thing on the tips, and is flat on the front, which makes us able to dance on our toes like we do. It’s called the box or platform. These shoes need to be the perfect size, otherwise the dancer can easily seriously hurt themselves. If the shoes are too small, their toes could break, but if they’re too big, they could snap their ankles. No two pairs of shoes are the same, so you can’t borrow anyone else’s. They need to be yours because otherwise the shoes won’t fit with your foot and how you dance. 
These shoes range from 50-85 dollars, depending on where you get them and what they’re made out of. They’re stiff as a board when you first get them, so you need to break them in. Breaking them in takes months. You have to dance in stiff, hard boxes until the shank and vamp finally takes to your foot. You will bleed. Some people actually cry because the pain of breaking the shoes in is so bad. Once they’re finally broken in, dancing in them is wonderful, even if it still hurts a little. But when they’re broken in, they only last a few more months until they fall apart completely. Then you need to get a new pair and break those in. 
In order to dance on these shoes, you need the proper cushioning for your toes, whether it be cotton, a soft gel slip over your toes, or wool. Your toenails need to be as short as you can make them, so that your nail can’t splinter and dig into your skin as you go up. Sometimes it happens anyway. Before a dancer can even consider dancing on the floor away from the bar, they need to practice for months, perfecting their balance, the set of their core, where their shoulders need to be, and how to go up. 
Going up is key to staying safe while dancing pointe. If you go up wrong, theres a 95% chance you will hurt yourself. To go up, you need to roll up from your heels to the tips of your toes, flat, and with precision. If you hop up, you’ll break your ankle. If you roll the wrong way, you’ll break your ankle. It literally needs to be perfect. Before leaving the bar, you need to be able to balance for about sixty seconds, to assure your instructor and yourself that you will be save doing forte turns and pirouettes, as well as gran-jete, glissade, leaps, and even waltzes. 
The next step is grace. You can’t blunder across the stage. You need to glide, flowing from each step to the other. The dance needs to look like a single step, moving continuously from each pose to another. Fingers need to be extended, necks elongated, shoulders down, chin up, stomach and butt tense and in, legs and back straight and toes pointed and turned out. The dance must always continue, even if you hurt yourself. If you can still move, you can still dance. If you’re bleeding in your shoe, there is no stopping and fixing it. You finish the dance and when it’s over you patch yourself up in the dressing room and continue on with your next dance if you have one. If you fall, you make it look like it was supposed to be in the dance. Your facial expressions and body need to reflect the music, so if you have a melancholy song, you must look forlorn, and depict it through your body and eyes, as well as the set of your mouth. Same as if your number was happy and upbeat, you need to reflect that. 
There are two major styles of ballet: Russian and Italian. An ideal ballerina knows both forms, and can tell the difference between the two. A dancer must follow the song with it’s beat as well, and the tempo can go from counts of four to sixteenth counts. 
Pointe dancers sometimes need to put resin on their shoes so that they don’t slip and risk breaking an arm, or even their neck. But if you put too much resin on, your shoes will stick, and you’ll fall while trying to turn. 
In conclusion, DANCE IS A FUCKING SPORT, OKAY? ESPECIALLY BALLET. WE RISK OURSELVES EVERY PRACTICE AND SHOW, SO DON’T YOU DARE FUCKING TELL ME THAT WHAT I DO ISN’T A SPORT. I PRACTICE FOR HOURS, JUST AS EVERY OTHER PERSON WHO PLAYS SOCCER OR FOOTBALL OR LACROSSE. I GET HURT AND I FALL AND I GET BRUISED AND I BREAK THINGS, JUST LIKE EVERYONE ELSE WHO PLAYS ALL THOSE OTHER FUCKING SPORTS. 
DANCE.
IS.
A.
SPORT.
So kindly fuck off if you think otherwise. 

Ballet is the most hardcore thing ever. People are all like “Oh football players are so tough!” Pbbbbt. Ballet dancers can dance through pain that would make a football player cry like a bitch.

This is true guys I attended a professional russian ballet school for 10 years of my life it’s so fucking true

Someone said it

Also, one of the girls in my dance studio has flat feet, which you can’t have in pointe, so she has to use a contraption to B E N D her feet so they have an arch.Ballet is fucking crazy.

I was in a Ballet studio for about 7 years and the last year I was there they finally allowed me to be in a pointe class but the problem was that I didn’t have strong enough ankles for pointe shoes so I was the only one in my class (and all the other pointe classes) that still had to wear ballet shoes

Okay, I totally agree that ballet is badass, and beautiful and hardcore. It’s athletic, and ballet dancers are absolutely athletes. That being said, I really don’t think it fits the modern connotation of “sport.” Sport seems to require an intersection of physicality and scored competition, and while ballet maybe competitive in a sense, there are no points scored, no qualitative measures taken, no “winner” as such. It is art, and I don’t think it’s an insult to call it that. It’s like saying “you’re not like the other girls.” What is wrong with the other girls? What is wrong with being art? I know it’s hard as hell. I know it’s physically taxing. But I don’t think it’s a sport. And that’s okay.

her-bleeding-little-blue-boy:

davidtennantbatch:

piper-mclean-rp:

deckatalent:

quezycoatl:

flutterbye-5:

You see these fuckers? They’re my pointe shoes. Now, I don’t know how much you guys know about ballet, but pointe is a style of ballet where the dancer dances on their toes. There’s a wooden box like thing on the tips, and is flat on the front, which makes us able to dance on our toes like we do. It’s called the box or platform. These shoes need to be the perfect size, otherwise the dancer can easily seriously hurt themselves. If the shoes are too small, their toes could break, but if they’re too big, they could snap their ankles. No two pairs of shoes are the same, so you can’t borrow anyone else’s. They need to be yours because otherwise the shoes won’t fit with your foot and how you dance. 

These shoes range from 50-85 dollars, depending on where you get them and what they’re made out of. They’re stiff as a board when you first get them, so you need to break them in. Breaking them in takes months. You have to dance in stiff, hard boxes until the shank and vamp finally takes to your foot. You will bleed. Some people actually cry because the pain of breaking the shoes in is so bad. Once they’re finally broken in, dancing in them is wonderful, even if it still hurts a little. But when they’re broken in, they only last a few more months until they fall apart completely. Then you need to get a new pair and break those in. 

In order to dance on these shoes, you need the proper cushioning for your toes, whether it be cotton, a soft gel slip over your toes, or wool. Your toenails need to be as short as you can make them, so that your nail can’t splinter and dig into your skin as you go up. Sometimes it happens anyway. Before a dancer can even consider dancing on the floor away from the bar, they need to practice for months, perfecting their balance, the set of their core, where their shoulders need to be, and how to go up. 

Going up is key to staying safe while dancing pointe. If you go up wrong, theres a 95% chance you will hurt yourself. To go up, you need to roll up from your heels to the tips of your toes, flat, and with precision. If you hop up, you’ll break your ankle. If you roll the wrong way, you’ll break your ankle. It literally needs to be perfect. Before leaving the bar, you need to be able to balance for about sixty seconds, to assure your instructor and yourself that you will be save doing forte turns and pirouettes, as well as gran-jete, glissade, leaps, and even waltzes. 

The next step is grace. You can’t blunder across the stage. You need to glide, flowing from each step to the other. The dance needs to look like a single step, moving continuously from each pose to another. Fingers need to be extended, necks elongated, shoulders down, chin up, stomach and butt tense and in, legs and back straight and toes pointed and turned out. The dance must always continue, even if you hurt yourself. If you can still move, you can still dance. If you’re bleeding in your shoe, there is no stopping and fixing it. You finish the dance and when it’s over you patch yourself up in the dressing room and continue on with your next dance if you have one. If you fall, you make it look like it was supposed to be in the dance. Your facial expressions and body need to reflect the music, so if you have a melancholy song, you must look forlorn, and depict it through your body and eyes, as well as the set of your mouth. Same as if your number was happy and upbeat, you need to reflect that. 

There are two major styles of ballet: Russian and Italian. An ideal ballerina knows both forms, and can tell the difference between the two. A dancer must follow the song with it’s beat as well, and the tempo can go from counts of four to sixteenth counts. 

Pointe dancers sometimes need to put resin on their shoes so that they don’t slip and risk breaking an arm, or even their neck. But if you put too much resin on, your shoes will stick, and you’ll fall while trying to turn. 

In conclusion, DANCE IS A FUCKING SPORT, OKAY? ESPECIALLY BALLET. WE RISK OURSELVES EVERY PRACTICE AND SHOW, SO DON’T YOU DARE FUCKING TELL ME THAT WHAT I DO ISN’T A SPORT. I PRACTICE FOR HOURS, JUST AS EVERY OTHER PERSON WHO PLAYS SOCCER OR FOOTBALL OR LACROSSE. I GET HURT AND I FALL AND I GET BRUISED AND I BREAK THINGS, JUST LIKE EVERYONE ELSE WHO PLAYS ALL THOSE OTHER FUCKING SPORTS. 

DANCE.

IS.

A.

SPORT.

So kindly fuck off if you think otherwise. 

Ballet is the most hardcore thing ever. People are all like “Oh football players are so tough!” Pbbbbt. Ballet dancers can dance through pain that would make a football player cry like a bitch.

This is true guys I attended a professional russian ballet school for 10 years of my life it’s so fucking true

Someone said it

Also, one of the girls in my dance studio has flat feet, which you can’t have in pointe, so she has to use a contraption to B E N D her feet so they have an arch.

Ballet is fucking crazy.

I was in a Ballet studio for about 7 years and the last year I was there they finally allowed me to be in a pointe class but the problem was that I didn’t have strong enough ankles for pointe shoes so I was the only one in my class (and all the other pointe classes) that still had to wear ballet shoes

Okay, I totally agree that ballet is badass, and beautiful and hardcore. It’s athletic, and ballet dancers are absolutely athletes. That being said, I really don’t think it fits the modern connotation of “sport.” Sport seems to require an intersection of physicality and scored competition, and while ballet maybe competitive in a sense, there are no points scored, no qualitative measures taken, no “winner” as such. It is art, and I don’t think it’s an insult to call it that. It’s like saying “you’re not like the other girls.” What is wrong with the other girls? What is wrong with being art? I know it’s hard as hell. I know it’s physically taxing. But I don’t think it’s a sport. And that’s okay.

(Source: butimnotinyour, via toughtink)

I once told a joke about a straight person.

They came after me in droves.

Each one singing the same:

Don’t fight fire with fire.

*

What they mean is: Don’t fight fire with anything.

Do not fight fire with water.

Do not fight fire with foam.

Do not evacuate the people.

Do not sound the alarms.

Do not crawl coughing and choking and spluttering to safety.

Do not barricade the door with damp towels.

Do not wave a white flag out of the window.

Do not take the plunge from several storeys up.

Do not shed a tear for your lover trapped behind a wall of flame.

Do not curse the combination of fuel, heat, and oxygen.

Do not ask why the fire fighters are not coming.

*

When they say: Don’t fight fire with fire.

What they mean is: Stand and burn.

” — Stand and Burn by Claudia Boleyn.  (via claudiaboleyn)

(via avocadosalad)

eviloverlibrarian:

gofuckyourselftomhiddleston:

thisperspective:

*violent muffled cursing*



*incoherent screaming*

i have nothing to add. *violent muffled cursing* indeed.

eviloverlibrarian:

gofuckyourselftomhiddleston:

thisperspective:

*violent muffled cursing*

image

*incoherent screaming*

i have nothing to add. *violent muffled cursing* indeed.

(Source: legion567)

[video]

Aug 16

coolfeminist:

This is really fucking powerful.

coolfeminist:

This is really fucking powerful.

(via resurrecthobbes)

rsmallbone:

This is so brilliant it makes me angry. You bastard, jonklassen.

love jon klassen, love this, despair for lack of personal coolness.

rsmallbone:

This is so brilliant it makes me angry. You bastard, jonklassen.

love jon klassen, love this, despair for lack of personal coolness.

[video]

Aug 15

[video]

Aug 14

clitriarchy:

If there was ever a time to NOT be using “poc” it’s now. Do not generalize. Do not say “what poc are going through!”. It’s black people. What BLACK PEOPLE are going through. It’s not generalized racism, it’s anti-black racism and this is a time to be direct and listen to /black/ people and talk about black people.

(via crossyourstitches)

Aug 13

[video]

thefrogman:

In the wake of her father’s death, some very cruel people sent disturbing messages to zeldawilliams. I found out that she is trying to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Hospital—a charity both her and her father have supported for a long time.
I thought maybe it would be a nice gesture if we could send some love her way and also help some kids in the process. I think that would be a fitting tribute and it might counter the internet awfulness she had to endure. 
DONATE HERE!

I love donating to St. Jude’s. Nothing feels better than helping kids.

thefrogman:

In the wake of her father’s death, some very cruel people sent disturbing messages to zeldawilliams. I found out that she is trying to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Hospital—a charity both her and her father have supported for a long time.

I thought maybe it would be a nice gesture if we could send some love her way and also help some kids in the process. I think that would be a fitting tribute and it might counter the internet awfulness she had to endure. 

DONATE HERE!

I love donating to St. Jude’s. Nothing feels better than helping kids.

(via comedyforthosewhothink)

[video]

Aug 12

toughtink:

egriz:

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

spudsworth:

If people are going to talk about Robin Williams’ mental health in order to raise awareness, please understand that he had bipolar disorder. And please understand that it is different from clinical depression. It requires awareness and understanding just as much as depression. 

I wasn’t aware of that. Thanks.

It may seem like splitting hairs, but this is important. Depression and bipolar disorder are not the same, but one can suffer from depressive episodes due to bipolar disorder.

it’s true that bipolar disorder also needs more awareness and understanding, but folks aren’t getting this depression news from no where. the official statement from his publicist said, “He has been battling severe depression of late.

Severe depression can be an aspect of bipolar disorder. The difference is it alternates with mania, but a lot of people don’t understand that mania isn’t always happy or creative. It can be dark and violent, and uncontrollably terrifying, even to the person experiencing it.

We don’t really know what Mr. Williams’ mental state was, only that it was too much for him to bear. There’s no need for pedantic hair-splitting. Let’s love the people around us, as best we can, and support them when they need us.

[video]

[video]